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«Definition of Done»

What is «Definition of done»?

The term «Definition of Done» (DoD) says something about the criteria that must be met before it can be said that a task has been completed.

Because when are we actually «done»? The concept of «Definition of Done»" seeks to help us find an answer to this question. The term is often used in agile development. Within teams which are working on frequent partial deliveries, discussions and disagreements can often arise regarding when functionality, code or product is actually «finished».«Definition of Done» is used as a checklist which defines what is expected when the task is completed. For example, is it when the code is checked in, when it has been tested, or when the end user can press the green button?

Cegal and "Definition of Done"

At Cegal, we have had good experiences of and see the importance of using of «Definition of Done»". Setting aside time at the start of a project to define what we as a team understand by the concept of «done» is an important part of the process of establishing a project, and lays the foundations for a common standard and guidelines.

For the development team or project team, you can set up a list of criteria, such as:

  • Check-in of code
  • Device testing
  • Code review by tech lead completed  
  • Acceptance criteria
  • Acceptance test

Having a common understanding of the term «done» offers potential time savings in that it ensures that work is carried out by ensuring that work is done as agreed. Reassurance for the team that a partial delivery is ready. A greater understanding between team members when a common “tribal language” is used produces concrete output and prevents misunderstandings.

Find out about project management at SYSCO >

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